20 Nuevos Soles Banknote (since 2011)

20 Nuevos Soles Banknote (since 2011)20 Nuevos Soles Banknote (since 2011)

20 Nuevos Soles Banknote (since 2011)
20 Nuevos Soles Banknote (since 2011)

Banknote Front Image

The front of the new S/. 20 banknote shows Raúl Porras Barrenechea. He was born in 1897 in Pisco. Raul Porras Barrenechea was a famous historian and professor who taught at numerous notable schools and universities in Lima. He also proceeded a diplomatic and political career. Raúl Porras Barrenechea was in charge of the Peruvian Representation before the Society of Nations and Peruvian Ambassador in Madrid. Later he was nominated as senator for Lima in the Congress. He reached the zenith of his political and diplomatic career in 1959 when he was appointment as Minister of Foreign Affairs. Due to ideological discrepancies with the government of Manuel Prado, Porras had to resign in 1960. Shortly afterwards he died.

Banknote Back Image

The back of the new S/. 20 bill shows a wall of the ancient city of Chan Chan, located in the north of Peru just a few km from the Pacific coast city of Trujillo. During its glory days Chan Chan was the largest pre-Columbian city in the Americas and the largest adobe city on earth. Covering an area of approximately 20 km², the huge adobe metropolis with around 10,000 buildings was the capital of the Chimú civilization, which lasted from 850 to around 1470. Even though the city was built in Peru's dry coastal desert, Chan Chan's fields and gardens flourished, thanks to a sophisticated network of irrigation canals and wells.

The center of the city was divided into nine walled "citadels" or "palaces" which housed temples, ceremonial areas, burial chambers, reservoirs, gardens, residences for the aristocracy, passageways and streets. Palaces and temples were decorated with elaborate friezes, reliefs and carvings, some of which were hundreds of feet long. Each citadel was surrounded by up to 15m high walls constructed of adobe brick finished with a smooth surface made of mud. Ordinary people lived outside the palaces.

After the Incas gained power Chan Chan lost its influence; with the Spanish conquest the magnificent city was plundered and then left deserted. Today the vulnerable adobe or earthen structures are severely threatened. Climate change, the weather phenomena El Niño causing torrential rains and floods in the area and wind from the ocean combined with salty air damages the natural constructions and leads to inexorable erosion. Big parts of Chan Chan already disappeared and archaeologists are trying hard to save what's left with continuous conservation measures; taking the enormous extension of Chan Chan into consideration a nearly impossible task. Today visitors can only enter one of the citadels, the Tschudi Complex.

Security Features

With the introduction of the new Nuevos Soles banknotes in 2011 the Peruvian Central Reserve Bank has expanded the implementation of worldwide established security features. Today all banknotes have similar security features making the verifying process really easy. Checking the money you receive for authenticity doesn't take long. So please take the few seconds and check at least by means of the one or other security features explained below if your bills pass the examination.

Watermark

Hold the banknote up to a light source and the area free of prints will be displaying the watermark. The watermark on the S/. 20 bill shows the image of Raúl Porras Barrenechea, the 20 and a book. The watermark has multi-tone and three dimensional features giving you the impression of three distinct areas. Furthermore the watermark is formed by different thicknesses in the paper so it appears sharp and clear. On fake banknotes the watermark is printed on, looks blurry and lacks the appearance of the multi-dimensional image.

Security thread

The security stripe is inserted into the paper and can only be seen when holding the bill up to a light source. Then you can as well easily read the text PERU 20 on the stripe and if you have really good eyesight under it three times BRCP (or with a magnifying glass). The text appears clear without any irregularities.

Optical variable ink

Hold the banknote comfortably in both hands and concentrate on the big 20 left of the image of the personality. Bop the note slowly a little bit up and down. As the 20 is printed with an optical variable ink (OVI) it changes its color from pink to green when slightly turned. This security feature is really easy to identify, but very difficult to counterfeit. Therefore on faked bills you won't see any color changes.

Complete the number

Have a look at the upper left corner. There you can see the incomplete number 20, parts are printed in brown. Turn the note and you find on the upper right corner again the incomplete number 20, this time parts are printed in light blue. Hold the banknote up to a light source and the brown parts from the front and the light blue parts from the back complete the number 20 perfectly.

Hidden Number

Hold the banknote horizontally in front of your eyes and concentrate on the on the personalities shoulder. Bop the bill slowly a little bit up and down. If you can find the right angle, the number 20 will appear.

Micro lettering

All new Nuevos Soles banknotes have the on first sight invisible security feature of micro-lettering. Only when using a magnifying glass you can read the prints. Look at the detailed description of all features in the below summary...

Micro lettering

All new Nuevos Soles banknotes have the on first sight invisible security feature of micro-lettering. Only when using a magnifying glass you can read the prints. Look at the detailed description of all features in the below summary...

Fluorescent Fibers

When you closely look at the S/. 20 bill you can see small grey to green fibers spread over the banknote (best discovered at the area free of print where the watermark is). When you place the banknote under UV light these fibers appear red or blue.

Fluorescent Features

Additionally to above mentioned fibers there are lots of other security features one can unfortunately only see under UV light. On the front of the S/. 20 banknote on Raúl Barrenechea's chin the word BCRP appears under UV light. On the back on the image of Chan Chan three times BCRP20 emerge. And the beautiful Huaco (a finely made pottery artwork / vessel) on the left changes its color from plain yellow to two fluorescent colors, green and red.

  • Watermark

    Hold the banknote up to a light source and the area free of prints will be displaying the watermark. The watermark on the S/. 20 bill shows the image of Raúl Porras Barrenechea, the 20 and a book. The watermark has multi-tone and three dimensional features giving you the impression of three distinct areas. Furthermore the watermark is formed by different thicknesses in the paper so it appears sharp and clear. On fake banknotes the watermark is printed on, looks blurry and lacks the appearance of the multi-dimensional image.

  • Security Stripe

    The security stripe is inserted into the paper and can only be seen when holding the bill up to a light source. Then you can as well easily read the text PERU 20 on the stripe and if you have really good eyesight under it three times BRCP (or with a magnifying glass). The text appears clear without any irregularities.

  • Optical variable Ink

    Hold the banknote comfortably in both hands and concentrate on the big 20 left of the image of the personality. Bop the note slowly a little bit up and down. As the 20 is printed with an optical variable ink (OVI) it changes its color from pink to green when slightly turned. This security feature is really easy to identify, but very difficult to counterfeit. Therefore on faked bills you won't see any color changes.

  • Complete the Number

    Have a look at the upper left corner. There you can see the incomplete number 20, parts are printed in brown. Turn the note and you find on the upper right corner again the incomplete number 20, this time parts are printed in light blue. Hold the banknote up to a light source and the brown parts from the front and the light blue parts from the back complete the number 20 perfectly.

  • Discover the Hidden Number 20

    Hold the banknote horizontally in front of your eyes and concentrate on the on the personalities shoulder. Bop the bill slowly a little bit up and down. If you can find the right angle, the number 20 will appear.

  • Micro-Lettering

    All new Nuevos Soles banknotes are literally plastered with the on first sight invisible security feature of micro-lettering. Only when using a magnifying glass you can read the prints. Look at the front of the bill; inside the 20 on the bottom right corner lines with the word BCRP alternating with lines with the word PERU (on the back of the bill you find the micro-lettered 20 on the left bottom corner) are visible.

    The nice ornament on the bottom left on the front of the bill consists of repeating geometrical figures which shows the number 20 inside. On top and bottom of the ornament the word BCRP is printed (on the back of the bill you find the micro-lettered ornament on the bottom right).

    Nearly in the middle of the 20 Nuevos Soles banknote at the top and at the bottom two short stripes can be seen. Under a magnifying glass inside the stripes the word BCRP appears continuously. These two stripes as well help blind people to recognize the value of the bill (1 stripe is a S/. 10 banknote, two stripes S/. 20, three stripes S/. 50, 4 stripes S/. 100 and 5 stripes S/. 200).

  • Fluorescent Fibers

    When you closely look at the S/. 20 bill you can see small grey to green fibers spread over the banknote (best discovered at the area free of print where the watermark is). When you place the banknote under UV light these fibers appear red or blue.

  • Fluorescent Features

    Additionally to above mentioned fibers there are lots of other security features one can unfortunately only see under UV light. On the front of the S/. 20 banknote on Raúl Barrenechea's chin the word BCRP appears under UV light. On the back on the image of Chan Chan three times BCRP20 emerge. And the beautiful Huaco (a finely made pottery artwork / vessel) on the left changes its color from plain yellow to two fluorescent colors, green and red.

Specifications

Value: 20 Nuevos Soles (New Suns)
Front Image: Raúl Porras Barrenechea
Back Image: Archaeological Complex of Chan Chan, Trujillo
Circulation Date: June 2011
Legal Tender: Yes
Size: 140 x 65 mm
Material: 100% Cotton
Color/s: Brown / Brown

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