200 Nuevos Soles Banknote (since 2011)

200 Nuevos Soles Banknote (since 2011)200 Nuevos Soles Banknote (since 2011)

200 Nuevos Soles Banknote (since 2011)
200 Nuevos Soles Banknote (since 2011)

Banknote Front Image

The front of the new S/. 200 banknote is decorated with Saint Rose of Lima, the patroness of Lima and Latin America, India and the Philippines. Saint Rose was born in 1568. Instead of marrying into money, the attractive young woman took a vow of virginity and decided to live a religious life, following the example of "Santa Catalina de Siena", devoting herself to a life of abnegation and self-mortification. She filled her day with praying, hard work, self-torture and helping sick and poor people in her community.

She died in 1617 at the age of 30. The remains of Saint Rose are today laid to rest in a chapel at the Church of Santo Domingo. St. Rose was beatified by Pope Clement IX in 1667, and canonized in 1671 by Pope Clement X as the first Catholic in the Americas to be canonized by the Roman Church.

Banknote Back Image

On the back of the S/. 200 bill you find a picture of the Sacred City of Caral. The ancient city is located around 200km north of Lima in the arid coastal desert stripe overlooking the valley of the Supe River. Built by the Norte Chico civilization around 5000 years ago on over 65 hectares, Caral is at least for the moment considered the oldest urban center in the Americas and one of the oldest civilizations of the world. The city was inhabited around 2600BC to 2000BC and accommodated more than 3000 people flourishing at the time the pyramids in Egypt were built.

 

Caral features complex and monumental structures like six large pyramids, temples, an amphitheater and residential buildings. The constructions required a high degree of technology and social organization. As no weapons or trace of warfare was found in Caral, it is assumed that the society was built on commerce, religious worship and pleasure. Scattered across the 80sq. km area of the Supe valley 19 other urban settlements were found that share similarities with Caral. This might indicate that the Sacred City was part of an even caster complex.

Caral aerial view

Aerial view of the main temple and characteristic round plaza of the Holy City of Caral

Map of Caral

Map of Caral indicating the main structures of the World Heritage Site

Caral - the oldest city in the Americas

Located about 200 km north of Lima, Caral was built by the Norte Chico civilization about 5000 years ago and is considered to be the oldest urban center in the Americas.

Caral - ancient structures

Caral was inhabited around 2600BC to 2000BC and accommodated more than 3000 people flourishing at the time as the old cultures in Mesopotamia, Egypt, India and China.

Caral - main pyramide  with circular plaza

Caral features complex and monumental structures like six large pyramids, temples, an amphitheater and residential buildings. In front of the main Pyramide a circular plaza was built.

Even though Caral was already discovered over 100 years ago, it was never assessed as important. No gold, no ceramics or other archaeological treasures were found. Only in 1996 excavation started, revealing the age and the importance of Caral. Since 2006 the complex is open for tourism. The Sacred City of Caral - Supe was declared World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 2009.

Security Features

With the introduction of the new Nuevos Soles banknotes in 2011 the Peruvian Central Reserve Bank has expanded the implementation of worldwide established security features. Today all banknotes have similar security features making the verifying process really easy. Checking the money you receive for authenticity doesn't take long. So please take the few seconds and check at least by means of the one or other security features explained below if your bills pass the examination.

Watermark

Hold the banknote up to a light source and the area free of prints will be displaying the watermark. The watermark on the S/. 200 bill shows the image of Santa Rosa, the 200 and an arcade. The watermark has multi-tone and three dimensional features giving you the impression of three distinct areas. Furthermore the watermark is formed by different thicknesses in the paper so it appears sharp and clear. On fake banknotes the watermark is printed on, looks blurry and lacks the appearance of the multi-dimensional image.

Security thread

It seems that parts of the security stripe are inserted into the paper; others seem to be on the paper. When holding the bill up to a light source the inserted parts appear dark, the ones on top light. On the visible parts you can spot small fish that move up and down or from left to right when tilting the banknote.

Optical variable ink

Hold the banknote comfortably in both hands and concentrate on the big 200 left of the image of the personality. Bop the note slowly a little bit up and down. As the 200 is printed with an optical variable ink (OVI) it changes its color from copper to green when slightly turned. This security feature is really easy to identify, but very difficult to counterfeit. Therefore on faked bills you won't see any color changes.

Complete the number

Have a look at the upper left corner. There you can see the incomplete number 200, parts are printed in ocher. Turn the note and you find on the upper right corner again the incomplete number 200, this time parts are printed in grey. Hold the banknote up to a light source and the ocher parts from the front and the grey parts from the back complete the number 200 perfectly.

Hidden Number

Hold the banknote horizontally in front of your eyes and concentrate on the nun's veil. Bop the bill slowly a little bit up and down. If you can find the right angle, the number 200 will appear.

Micro lettering

All new Nuevos Soles banknotes have the on first sight invisible security feature of micro-lettering. Only when using a magnifying glass you can read the prints. Look at the detailed description of all features in the below summary...

Micro lettering

All new Nuevos Soles banknotes have the on first sight invisible security feature of micro-lettering. Only when using a magnifying glass you can read the prints. Look at the detailed description of all features in the below summary...

Fluorescent Fibers

When you closely look at the S/. 200 bill you can see small grey to green fibers spread over the banknote (best discovered at the area free of print where the watermark is). When you place the banknote under UV light these fibers appear red or blue.

Fluorescent Features

Additionally to above mentioned fibers there are a few other security features one can unfortunately only see under UV light. On the front of the S/. 200 banknote on Santa Rosa's chin the word BCRP appears under UV light. On the back of the S/. 200 banknote on the image of Caral three times BCRP200 emerge. And the image on the left changes its color from plain yellow to two fluorescent colors, green and red.

  • Watermark

    Hold the banknote up to a light source and the area free of prints will be displaying the watermark. The watermark on the S/. 200 bill shows the image of Santa Rosa, the 200 and an arcade. The watermark has multi-tone and three dimensional features giving you the impression of three distinct areas. Furthermore the watermark is formed by different thicknesses in the paper so it appears sharp and clear. On fake banknotes the watermark is printed on, looks blurry and lacks the appearance of the multi-dimensional image.

  • Security Stripe

    It seems that parts of the security stripe are inserted into the paper; others seem to be on the paper. When holding the bill up to a light source the inserted parts appear dark, the ones on top light. On the visible parts you can spot small fish that move up and down or from left to right when tilting the banknote.

  • Optical variable Ink

    Hold the banknote comfortably in both hands and concentrate on the big 200 left of the image of the personality. Bop the note slowly a little bit up and down. As the 200 is printed with an optical variable ink (OVI) it changes its color from copper to green when slightly turned. This security feature is really easy to identify, but very difficult to counterfeit. Therefore on faked bills you won't see any color changes.

  • Complete the Number

    Have a look at the upper left corner. There you can see the incomplete number 200, parts are printed in ocher. Turn the note and you find on the upper right corner again the incomplete number 200, this time parts are printed in grey. Hold the banknote up to a light source and the ocher parts from the front and the grey parts from the back complete the number 200 perfectly.

  • Discover the Hidden Number 200

    Hold the banknote horizontally in front of your eyes and concentrate on the nun's veil. Bop the bill slowly a little bit up and down. If you can find the right angle, the number 200 will appear.

  • Micro-Lettering

    All new Nuevos Soles banknotes have the on first sight invisible security feature of micro-lettering. Only when using a magnifying glass you can read the prints. Look at the front of the bill; inside the 200 on the bottom right corner lines with the word PERU (on the back of the bill you find the micro-lettered 10 on the left bottom corner) can be read.

    Nearly in the middle of the 200 Nuevos Soles banknote at the top and at the bottom five short stripes can be seen. Under a magnifying glass inside the stripes the word BCRP or the 200 appears continuously. These five stripes as well help blind people to recognize the value of the bill (1 stripe is a S/. 10 banknote, two stripes S/. 20, three stripes S/. 50, 4 stripes S/. 100 and 5 stripes S/. 200).

  • Fluorescent Fibers

    When you closely look at the S/. 200 bill you can see small grey to green fibers spread over the banknote (best discovered at the area free of print where the watermark is). When you place the banknote under UV light these fibers appear red or blue.

  • Fluorescent Features

    Additionally to above mentioned fibers there are a few other security features one can unfortunately only see under UV light. On the front of the S/. 200 banknote on Santa Rosa's chin the word BCRP appears under UV light. On the back of the S/. 200 banknote on the image of Caral three times BCRP200 emerge. And the image on the left changes its color from plain yellow to two fluorescent colors, green and red.

Specifications

Value: 200 Nuevos Soles (New Suns)
Front Image: Saint Rose
Back Image: Sacred City of Caral, Lima
Circulation Date: June 2011
Legal Tender: Yes
Size: 140 x 65 mm
Material: 100% Cotton
Color/s: Grey / Grey

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